New Panel Added to March 26-28, 2017 Higher Education Conference: Adjunct Faculty Unemployment Benefits Eligibility

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on March 10th, 2017
We are pleased to announce the addition of a new panel to examine the issue of unemployment eligibility for adjunct faculty and the significance of the new guidance issued by the United States Department of Labor. The panel will include speakers Jason Myers, Chief Administrative Law Judge, New York State Unemployment Appeals Board, Nancy Cross, SEIU Local 1 Vice President, Louis P. DiLorenzo, Bond, Schoeneck & King, PLLC, and Maria Maisto, New Faculty Majority, Moderator. Read more →

The Winds of Changes Shift

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on February 18th, 2017
LAWCHA member William Herbert, the Executive Director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions at Hunter College, has just published an important article on collective bargaining in higher education. See “The Winds of Changes Shift: An Analysis of recent Growth in Bargaining Units and Representation Efforts in Higher Education,” which appears in the recent issue of the Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy. Read more →

Convert Lines or Convert People?: The Polarizing Debate Over How to Restore Faculty Tenure

by Trevor Griffey  on February 6th, 2017
On January 12, 2017, faculty unions representing community and technical college faculty across Washington state got their allies in the Washington state legislature to introduce HB 1168, a law that would compel the state’s community and technical colleges to ensure that seventy percent of their faculty will be on the tenure track by 2023. Read more →

National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions: January, 2017

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on January 20th, 2017
In this issue: Dr. Martin Luther King on the Purpose of Education, National Center’s 2017 Annual Conference registration, Interactive Training Workshops, Collective Bargaining and Unionization at Private Sector Institutions, and more! Read more →

Subscribe to the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions Newsletter

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on January 20th, 2017
This January newsletter of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions contains a number of updates about adjunct organizing, as well as graduate employee and other faculty organizing or collective bargaining. Thanks again to William Herbert, executive director, for forwarding this. LAWCHA members can sign up for the newsletter for free! Read more →

The Decline of Faculty Tenure: Less From an Oversupply of PhDs, and More from the Systematic De-Valuation of the PhD as a Credential for College Teaching

by Trevor Griffey  on January 9th, 2017
Contrary to what most journalists and many academics argue, an “oversupply” of people with PhDs is not the primary cause of the decline of tenure for college faculty in the U.S. Read more →

National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, December, 2016

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on December 24th, 2016
The National Center E-Note is a monthly electronic newsletter containing research and analysis relevant to unionization and collective bargaining in higher education and the professions. Read more →

Collective Bargaining and Unit Composition

by William Herbert  on December 24th, 2016
An important issue in collective bargaining, with significant consequences for contingent faculty, is unit composition. At the April 3-5, 2016 annual conference in New York City of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions, a panel discussed the impact that faculty composition can have on collective bargaining. Read more →

LAWCHA Statement on Collective Bargaining for All Faculty

by LAWCHA Board of Directors  on December 17th, 2016
The Labor and Working Class History Association (LAWCHA) applauds and endorses the Organization of American Historians (OAH) “Statement on Collective Bargaining and Part-Time, Adjunct, and Contingent History Faculty.” Read more →

Unionization and Collective bargaining in higher education – Newsletter from Hunter College center, November, 2016

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on December 5th, 2016
Here’s the November installment of The National Center E-Note, a monthly electronic newsletter containing research and analysis relevant to unionization and collective bargaining in higher education and the professions. Read more →

Unionization and Collective bargaining in higher education – Newsletter from Hunter College center, October, 2016

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on November 29th, 2016
The National Center E-Note is a monthly electronic newsletter containing research and analysis relevant to unionization and collective bargaining in higher education and the professions. View their October, 2016 newsletter. Read more →

Contingent Academic Labor, Special Issue of Working USA

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on September 25th, 2016
The September 2015 special issue of Working USA is dedicated to “Contingent Academic Labor: The Way Forward.” All of the articles in the volume focus on some aspect of the growing ranks of contingent academic labor, including analyses of its causes and consequences, updates on successful faculty organizing, and strategies for responding to and slowing the trend. Access to the full content of the journal requires a subscription. Read more →

Claire Goldstene, “The Politics of Contingent Academic Labor”

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on September 25th, 2016
Claire Goldstene’s 2012 article, “The Politics of Contingent Academic Labor,” in the NEA journal Thought & Action, argues that the shift to a majority contingent faculty is not primarily about financial considerations (despite such administrative explanations) but is, instead, about diminishing the intellectual protections of tenure, curtailing the collective voice of faculty, and, as a consequence, undermining the university as a space for the open exchange of ideas. For Goldstene these developments have particularly detrimental consequences for the development of politically progressive ideas. Read more →

Michael McCown, “How Community-College Faculty Organized a Strike and Scored a Contract,” Portside (September 7, 2016)

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on September 25th, 2016
For the first time in its 40-year history, the union of full- and part-time faculty at City College of San Francisco recently went on strike—and it worked. Read more →

When Unfair Labor Relations Reify, It’s Time to Strike

by Georgette Fleischer  on September 25th, 2016
What an irony it is that institutions of higher learning have become some of the worst exploiters of workers in America. Those of us who work in higher education have a responsibility to fight this terrible trend with everything we’ve got. Read more →

Decline of Tenure for Higher Education Faculty: An Introduction

by Trevor Griffey  on September 2nd, 2016
For most college and university instructors in the United States today, teaching provides neither the job security nor income typically associated with middle class careers. That is because about 70 percent of all instructors are not eligible for tenure. Read more →

It is About Time: LAWCHA’s Committee on Contingent Faculty

by James Gregory  on September 1st, 2016
This blog introduces LAWCHA’s newest and most important initiative. Last year, with encouragement from past president Nancy MacLean, an ad hoc committee drafted proposals that the Board of Directors adopted at its April 2016 meeting, most importantly creating the Committee on Contingent Faculty which manages this blog. LAWCHA is now fully committed to fighting precarity in academic labor markets, the great crisis of higher education. Read more →

Recommendations made by LAWCHA’s contingent faculty committee

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on August 31st, 2016
In March of 2015, LAWCHA’s recently formed ad hoc committee on contingent faculty issued its first report and set of recommendations. This was the result of the committee’s discussions about ways to foster the full participation of adjunct and contingent faculty in LAWCHA. The committee also talked about how LAWCHA might respond to the rapidly changing contemporary academic workplace, in which contingent faculty play an ever larger role. Read more →

Welcome to the Contingent Faculty Committee Blog

by Eric Fure-Slocum  on August 31st, 2016
Welcome to LAWCHA’s blog on contingent faculty and contingent labor! This blog offers an opportunity to share updates, scholarship, opinions, questions, links, and strategies. While the concerns and challenges contingent faculty face will be a main focus of this blog, we hope to engage questions about what the growing presence of adjuncts means for higher education. We also expect that contributions to this blog will begin to connect the history of contingent faculty in academia to the larger history of precarious labor. Please send contributions for the blog to Eric Fure-Slocum ([email protected]), chair of LAWCHA’s contingent faculty committee. Read more →