posts categorized asArticles

“Bad Dudes”: Immigrants, Illegality, and Human Rights

by on February 27, 2017

By sweepingly associating immigrants who overstayed their visa or crossed the border improperly with criminal activity, the President built upon a long tradition in U.S. political culture. Indeed, although his policies represent a major shift, they were made possible by a consistent strategy deployed since the 1970s to portray unauthorized immigration as criminal.

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Jews in the Labor Movement: Past, Present and Future

by on October 2, 2016

Think of the greatest strikes in US labor history. Apart from the garment workers’ strikes in New York and Chicago before World War One, none come to mind in which Jews played a major role. But if you look a little closer, you will find Jews as the ferment for a great deal of radical labor activism.

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A Century of Teacher Organizing: What Can We Learn?

by on October 30, 2014

The history of teacher unionism is rich and vibrant, filled with numerous triumphs, tensions, and setbacks. For over a century, most education employees have been part of a public sector workforce that has been constrained by legal frameworks that assume that they are not entitled to the same rights as private sector workers.

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Peter Rachleff, “Struggle against racist sports nicknames gives labor movement opportunity to discover its own history – and find a path forward”

by on November 11, 2013

In early September the AFL-CIO held a dramatic convention in Los Angeles. With the labor movement’s segment of the U.S. workforce down to a meager 11 percent, leaders urged the pursuit of new paths, what they called “a historic opening in the labor movement.” President Richard Trumka called on the more than one hundred year old federation to open its arms to embrace new kind of organizations – worker centers, worker associations, and associate member organizations.

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