posts and bio Rosemary Feurer

Rosemary Feurer is an Associate Professor of History at Northern Illinois University.

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Historic Levels of Inequality

by on July 4, 2016

The pundits always seem to miss the politics of capitalism in their effort to explain inequality.

It looks like a new book by Peter Lindert and Jeffrey Williamson, Unequal Gains: American Growth and Inequality Since 1700, is gaining traction among the punditry class, following last year’s nod to Thomas Piketty’s Capital.

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NALHC: Labor, Law, and Progressive Activism (CFP Deadline: April 30)

by , on March 24, 2015

October 22-24, 2015, Wayne State University, Detroit, Michigan. 37th Annual North American Labor History Conference. The Program Committee of the NALHC, an international conference with global perspectives on labor history, invites proposals for papers, panels, roundtables, talks, etc. on the theme of Labor, Law, and Progressive Activism for our thirty-seventh annual meeting.

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Growing Apart by Colin Gordon: Great Teaching Resource

by on November 14, 2014

Growing Apart is one of the most valuable tools for teaching about labor and inequality that I have seen in recent years. It’s a one-stop place for all the great graphs and charts to show the rise in inequality, the rise of right-to-work states, the declining value of the minimum wage versus the rise in executive pay at the top.This great new website by Colin Gordon is a treasure trove as a teaching resource.

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“Yes, Ludlow Was a Massacre” by DeStefanis & Feurer, with Response by Martelle and Andrews

Anthony DeStefanis and Rosemary Feurer wrote blogs simultaneously in response to a central question raised at the Ludlow Commemoration this weekend: Was Ludlow a Massacre? We present these here separately, and invite commentary.  UPDATE: We now have a response from Scott Martelle, who initiated the question.

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Connecting teachers struggles to the public good

by on March 7, 2014

The Chicago Teachers Union’s (CTU) recent decision to boycott Illinois Standards Achievement Tests, its efforts to fight privatization of education and school closures, and its attempt to break free from business-as-usual politics harkens back to a rich and largely hidden history.

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