Eric Fure-Slocum

posts and bio Eric Fure-Slocum

Eric Fure-Slocum is Associate Professor of History at St. Olaf College. He is the author of multiple books and articles on U.S. urban and working-class history.

Website


The Winds of Changes Shift

by on February 18, 2017

LAWCHA member William Herbert, the Executive Director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions at Hunter College, has just published an important article on collective bargaining in higher education. See “The Winds of Changes Shift: An Analysis of recent Growth in Bargaining Units and Representation Efforts in Higher Education,” which appears in the recent issue of the Journal of Collective Bargaining in the Academy.

Read more →

The Winds of Changes Shift

by on February 9, 2017

LAWCHA member William Herbert, the Executive Director of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions at Hunter College, has just published an important article on collective bargaining in higher education.

Read more →

Subscribe to the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions Newsletter

by on January 20, 2017

This January newsletter of the National Center for the Study of Collective Bargaining in Higher Education and the Professions contains a number of updates about adjunct organizing, as well as graduate employee and other faculty organizing or collective bargaining. Thanks again to William Herbert, executive director, for forwarding this.

Read more →

Claire Goldstene, “The Politics of Contingent Academic Labor”

by on September 25, 2016

Claire Goldstene’s 2012 article, “The Politics of Contingent Academic Labor,” in the NEA journal Thought & Action, argues that the shift to a majority contingent faculty is not primarily about financial considerations (despite such administrative explanations) but is, instead, about diminishing the intellectual protections of tenure, curtailing the collective voice of faculty, and, as a consequence, undermining the university as a space for the open exchange of ideas.

Read more →